Food for Thought with Dana Renee Ashmore

As 2016 winds down, we’re excited to share one last interview in the “Food for Thought” series. This week we welcome Dana Renee Ashmore to the blog. After years as a film and television producer, this inspiring lady used her great eye, florist chops and passion for giving back to found Gratitude Collaborative. The L.A.-based company offers curated gift boxes with a built in donation to provide meals to USA children in need. (It also happens to be the perfect holiday gift source if you’re panicking about what to get your boss/best friend/mother-in-law this year.) Read on for Dana’s insights on social media, creativity and what having a mission means for your brand.

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1. What do you look for when you’re searching for brands to include in the Gratitude Collaborative boxes?

We look at brands that we have tried and tested and love, and we love working with smaller brands and knowing the people behind the items we sell. We also trust our friends and people we work with. Every week we sit down and discuss new brands and see if we can find new ones to bring on.

2. How do you find inspiration when you’re in a rut creatively?

Step away and do something fun. Whenever I spend too much time trying to think of something to do, or feel like I’m in a rut, I just get out with friends and take my mind off of it. I think sometimes over-thinking can really make it worse. It’s really doing what feels natural instead of forced.

3. What are challenges you’ve encountered running a small business that aims to give back?

A couple things:  Our brand is that we are a gift company that gives back by providing meals to kids in the USA. In the beginning, our charitable efforts were well-intentioned but unfocused.  We provided art classes, after-school sponsorships and schools supplies to families that needed it. We still do more than provide meals, but at the time, people were really confused by what we were doing. They knew we gave back, but our brand wasn’t aligned with our mission. I think with a company that gives back, you just have to be clear on what you do, and make it easy to understand.

Second, what to do with the little money you have, and how to get yourself out there. Since your profits are not all going back to you or the company, you have smaller margins. It’s hard to make the right choices to help get your name out there. It’s hard when no one knows you and you are just getting started. It’s hard to try to sell yourself in an over-saturated and overexposed market.

4. How do you make sure your social media content is always on brand?

The best advice I have ever been given is to take 90% of my photos with a digital camera and the rest with my iPhone. That’s not for everyone, but for what we sell, we want the flowers to always be consistent in lighting and colors. In the beginning we tried a few things that didn’t work and then naturally fell into a place where we feel comfortable. I also use an app called Planoly; it helps me see my photos in a grid before they post so I can make sure they match with the other ones. This app has helped so much.

5. If you could speak to pre-business starting Dana, what advice would you give? Is there a piece of common advice given to small business owners that you would tell her to ignore?

Trust yourself and Customer Service is a must. Starting a small business is full of small decisions that can cost you lots of money.  You have to know ahead of time that not everything is going to be a win and leave financial space for that to happen.  As for Customer Service, we have someone that checks emails almost 24 hours a day to make sure we are available. Our customers are the reason any small business is running, and you have to remember that even when you’re tired, frustrated and hungry. Some customers will always think you are Amazon and have hundreds of people working around the clock. Instead, you have 3.

Keep up with Dana Renee at Gratitude Collaborative and on her beautiful Instagram.

Food for Thought with Leslie Stephens

We’re back with another “Food for Thought” this week featuring Cupcakes and Cashmere Associate Editor Leslie Stephens. The SPPR team met Leslie over a can of wine and immediately bonded with this friendly foodie. Leslie recently moved from New York where she was a Food52 editor. She now brings her adventurous spirit and an enthusiasm for food, fashion and décor to Cupcakes and Cashmere with fun and fresh coverage. Read on for a real look at what it’s like to turn a penchant for writing and a love of food into an awesome career.

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1. What’s the biggest difference between the NY and LA food scenes?

Historically in New York, the best food has always been equated with high-end restaurants opened by top chefs, like Thomas Keller’s Per Se or Daniel Humm’s Eleven Madison Park, even though there’s recently been a shift towards high-end restaurants opened by previously unknown, young chefs, like Contra and Semilla. In L.A. however, the hole-in-the-wall spots are much more celebrated, which is why you get this amazing culture of street tacos, food trucks, and tiny San Gabriel Valley Chinese restaurants on Jonathan Gold’s 101 list of best restaurants.

2. What do you look for when you’re searching for Cupcakes & Cashmere content inspiration?

When it comes to writing for a lifestyle blog, content is everywhere. A meal at an amazing taco truck can become an article on the Best Tacos in L.A. the same way a simple, unique tradition can become a whole post idea. Since the blog is so interwoven with our lives, the content is really coming from everything we find interesting and engaging in our own lives.

3. What do you do when writers block hits or you’re in a rut creatively?

I feel like there’s no writer’s block or creative rut a quick conversation can’t fix. Even saying, “Hey, what do you think of this?” to my Editorial Director is often enough to span a back-and-forth conversation that can get me back on the right track or guide me towards a new, more interesting direction. To me, that’s the value of working with a tight-knit team.

4. We heard you’re a Pete Wells fan, anyone else you admire or look up to in the food industry?

Food writers are my celebrities: Kate Krader, Sam Sifton, Andrew Knowlton, Phyllis Grant, Adam Sachs, our contributor, Gaby Dalkin, Ruth Reichl, Mimi Sheraton, Dana Goodyear, Jonathan Gold—the list literally doesn’t stop.

5. What advice would you give someone hoping to have a career in editorial? 

Start doing it in any way you can. The hardest part of becoming a writer or editor is creating a body of work you can show as an example at an interview, so if you’re able to write your own blog or even pitch a few freelance articles, every piece of work counts.

Keep up with Leslie Stephens at Cupcakes and Cashmere and on Instagram.

Food for Thought with Jami Curl

We talk a lot about food at Soda Pop PR. The team is constantly swapping restaurant recommendations and deliberations for where to order our weekly team lunch start at 10 a.m. on Thursdays. Which is why we’re excited to announce our new interview series “Food for Thought.” Each month, we’ll explore the business behind the food industry and how foodie creatives find inspiration and get through tough times.

This week we’re kicking things off with SPPR client and candy-extraordinaire Jami Curl who is the founder of QUIN Candy- a small-batch, handmade candy company headquartered in Portland. Jami has been dubbed the “new Willy Wonka” by Bon Appètit and is listed as one of Fast Company’s most creative people in business. She is currently working with Ten Speed Press on a book ‘Candy is Magic: Real Ingredients, Modern Recipes.’ For sale in March 2017, Candy is Magic will share Jami’s candy secrets and best stories. Read on to work up a creative appetite.

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1. Staying inspired is EVERYTHING for a creative and we can all feel stuck sometimes. How do you get unstuck?

I am very thankful to have many things going on at once – so, if I’m stuck on something I’m writing, I can switch over to a recipe I’m trying to work out. Or, if a recipe isn’t quite working, I can walk away from it and focus a bit on marketing or something we’re promoting at QUIN.

I do tend to have zero separation between work and home – I work on work at home and I work on home at work. I work all hours of all days – whether it’s 6am on a Saturday or 11:30pm on a Tuesday. Because of this, ahem, “variety” of types of work and working hours, I rarely find myself stuck.

That said, I never give much thought to inspiration. It might just be because of how serious I am about work – but I rarely sit back and wonder or think about what’s going to inspire me on any given day. Not to get too Psychology Today on you, but I think it has to do with the fact that I rarely seek outside “help” for inspiration or energy. I rely only on myself for that stuff. This self-reliance is threaded through my entire life, not just work life. I rarely ask for help, I don’t look to others for happiness, I know in my heart it’s my responsibility to make myself happy, fulfilled, inspired, and motivated. (Note: I am an INTJ (Myers-Briggs) – so that might explain a lot. And, if you haven’t Myers-Briggs’ed yourself, I HIGHLY RECOMMEND.) Anyways, all my motivation and ideas come from the inside – not the outside. I basically just keep working and ideas keep coming. I truly hope it stays this way for the rest of my days because there’s really nothing like it.

 2. Can you share one of your first “pinch me” moments when you realized QUIN’s success was real?

“Success” is tricky because it’s a word that is generally controlled and defined by outside sources instead of the internal self. My self-defined version of success is this: that I wake up each day happy. Happy to be where I am in life, happy that my job is this job in candy. I feel successful when I’m fulfilled. When the ideas in my head tumble out and they somehow make sense to others – these moments are my successful moments.

By that definition, I have to say that one of the “pinch me” moments has to be the first day of the QUIN cookbook photoshoot. A group of very talented women surrounding me, I explained a vision – and they set to work making it come to life in photos. On so many levels I couldn’t believe it was happening – it made the book more real, it validated my vision for the candy in the book, it solidified and made visual thoughts and ideas that previously only existed in my head. I wish I could explain how totally crazy that feels – but, let me tell you – IT FEELS TOTALLY CRAZY!

In terms of success for QUIN – I think the “pinch me” moments are smaller moments – little bits of positive news, or a great new account, or a good piece of press – all of these moments add up to this experience that is overall absolutely, definitely a “pinch me” situation. That QUIN works at all, even in our slow times, is still totally unreal to me.

3. You have a very fun, active social media presence. How do you “unplug” or turn off when you need to recharge?

Oh, thank you. I actually think I’m the worst social media person. The first problem is that I’m pretty much a conscientious objector to the use of hashtags. I can’t get over the full paragraphs of hashtags that people add to posts. I 100% understand their usefulness, but that still won’t convince me to do it. Still, I like to have fun with social media and I’m a total weirdo at home, so I share a lot of that.

I spend a lot of time every day unplugged and turned off because I love to read. When waiting for an appointment or meeting to start, for a coffee or for a table, instead of scrolling through my phone, I’m reading a book. I never, ever leave the house without the book I’m currently reading. Those minutes during the day of leaving my phone in my bag and grabbing my book instead – they’re super essential mini-breaks for me.

I also schedule a full hour of reading every night before bed – it’s my favorite part of every day because I read with my little boy – each of us in a side-by-side twin bed, reading our books. I push through each day to get to this most magic of hours, I love it and treasure the time with him so much.

One other thing – I take a long walk (about 5 miles) every morning. I’ll allow myself to listen to a Podcast or music, but I don’t allow myself to check social media during my walks. Walking is the best because it’s really easy, and it’s mindless enough to allow yourself to be mindful (I swear that makes sense if you think about it.)

4. There’s a lot of buzz around the “habits of highly effective people.” What are some of your own personal habits for productive days and helping QUIN run efficiently?

I don’t keep a calendar or a to-do list electronically. I write EVERYTHING down. On paper. I keep a physical paper calendar/planner with me – and I basically just check it often (super often) to make sure I’m on track. I’m pencil obsessed, so that helps, but writing out lists, calendars, ideas, goals – actually WRITING it (not typing it or merely thinking it) helps to keep me on target.

I don’t sleep in. I get up at 6 every day (even on weekends) and try to do at least three things right away that will make me feel like I’m on track for a productive day. This could be as simple as unloading the dishwasher or starting a load of laundry, answering emails or writing a thank you note, organizing receipts or working on book edits – just three things right away – I find it sets me up for success all day long (three things PLUS coffee, that is.)

5. As a veteran of Feast Portland, what are you most looking forward to this year?

I’m excited about the candy we’re doing for Night Market – something we’ve never done before that has our entire staff TOTALLY EXCITED. I love stuff like that – a super fun candy that we can all get behind.

I think it’s great that Feast is five this year and that they’re putting the effort into celebrating that fact. I am also so happy that QUIN is part of the celebration – we created a special candy to help Feast celebrate this milestone birthday, and I was so honored that they even asked us to do it. I think the feeling of celebration is what Feast is all about – celebrating food and creativity and the bounty of Oregon and the people who work so hard to put out great food in restaurants – it all combines and the result is this string of days that all seem like a party. It’s almost like college again – everyone in town is kind of focused on the same thing, and I love that feeling of crazy unity. I’m looking forward to that spirit settling in on the city for a few days, for sure.

Follow along with Jami’s adventures at Feast PDX and beyond here.

5 Questions with SPPR Featuring Camryn Jun

This week we’re excited to welcome our new intern Camryn Jun to the blog. Camryn joins Soda Pop PR with marketing experience and boundless enthusiasm for the world of PR. She also shares our company-wide Scandal obsession!

Read on to learn about Camryn’s female role models, favorite way to start the day and what being a college athlete taught her about life.

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1. We are all about girl power at SPPR, who is one of your favorite girl bosses or female role models?

As cliché as it sounds, my favorite female role model is my mom. (Pause for eye roll here). There are a lot of amazing girl bosses out there that I draw inspiration from, but I don’t know any of them well enough to say I model my life after them, not like my mom. To me, my mom is living proof that I can have it all as long as I’m willing to put in the work. She is the boss at work and the boss at home. She started working as a temp and worked her way up to Chief of Staff and Resources, all while raising three kids and maintaining a 26-year marriage. She makes me excited for the future and determined to break stereotypes, because I know I don’t have to sacrifice family for my career and vice versa, and when it gets hard and I need advice I’ll already have the best coach.

2. What excites you most about the PR industry?

I love that it’s a female dominated industry, but I am most excited about how young it is. Social media has created a whole new job market, and PR plays an integral role in that. Technology is always advancing so strategies and trends are always changing. It definitely keeps publicists on their toes! This puts the industry in a constant state of growth because it’s directly related to the way people connect and communicate. I’m a total people-person, so I’m really inspired by the idea of being part of an industry that revolves around building relationships.

3. What is one important lesson you learned from being a college athlete that you have applied to your life?

I’ve learned a lot from playing soccer most of my life, and the lesson that was hardest to learn but most applicable to my life off the field is: mistakes are going to happen and it’s okay to fail. You can’t dwell on the mistake and allow it to take you out of the game. You have to dust yourself off, make an adjustment, and keep playing as hard as you can. The best player on the field isn’t the one who never makes a mistake, it’s the one who always recovers. Like in any game of soccer, challenges and setbacks are just a part of life and this sport has taught me how to face adversity with resilience and a positive attitude.

4. Are you a morning person or a night owl? What’s your favorite way to start or finish the day?

To be honest, my answer usually depends on what day of the week it is, but for the most part I am turning into more of a morning person! I love to start my day with the CorePower yoga sculpt class before work. Sometimes it’s a struggle to get up before the sun, but I always feel energized and ready to take on the day after I get my work out in!

5. If you were given the funds and resources to start a charity organization, what would it be?

My charity organization would focus on improving the overall wellness of our veterans and lobbying for higher pension rates for them. I would make physical rehabilitation, reemergence to civilian society, and mental health resources more accessible to the men and women who sacrifice everything for our freedom. My organization’s ultimate mission would be to eliminate the veteran percentage of America’s homeless population. They are our nation’s heroes and we need to treat them like it!

5 Questions with SPPR Featuring Deidre Weight

This week, we are excited to introduce our newest addition to the Soda Pop PR family: Account Executive Deidre Weight. With years of PR experience and event planning chops, Deidre is smart, media savvy and rarely without sunglasses.

Check out our interview with Deidre below to learn more about her networking tips and most embarrassing work moment.

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1. There are many types of industries to focus on in PR – beauty, entertainment, fashion, etc. What made you choose hospitality & lifestyle PR?

Growing up in LA, it was hard not to be exposed to this industry – especially hospitality and tourism.  It wasn’t until I moved to San Diego and began my coursework that I really understood the different industries I can pursue. You know, the realization that “PR” isn’t all red carpets and glamour! I’ve always been interested in entertainment and hospitality, and my first internship in college was at a hospitality group, naturally. I LOVED it!

As a senior at SDSU, I was required to take a PR occupation course which hosted a professional across different industries each week, and I was so fascinated by this field. I later worked with several lifestyle, food and hospitality brands during my time in San Diego. The path I took prepared me for SPPR where I’m able to showcase my expertise with hospitality and lifestyle brands, while still ‘biting’ into the food space.

2. You’re a natural at networking. What advice or tips do you have to share for young professionals looking to up their networking game?

  • Sign up for internships. Many of my post-college job opportunities have been referrals from prior jobs or internships in college. If you’re unable to take part in an internship, set up an informative interview with a local agency or in-house company to get your questions answered and learn about a “day in the life.”
  • Attend local networking events in your area. Whether it is through school or the community, it’s important (and useful) to meet people in your field.
  • Get involved. PRSSA is a great program for undergrads!
  • Don’t miss an opportunity to network on your free time. You never know who you might run into, or better yet who they might know!
  • Social media is your friend. If you’re not on LinkedIn, sign up today. If you don’t utilize Twitter to seek new media relationships, get tweeting!

3. If you could eat any meal in the world right now, what and where would it be?

Tortilla Soup from La Cocina, a family-owned restaurant in Santa Clarita. The restaurant is walking distance from my childhood home. It’s so good, my family still eats there every Friday night!

4. What are three things you can’t live without?

  • Hair-ties – I always end my day with a good messy bun.
  • Sunglasses  – you’ll rarely see me out without them!
  • Hot sauce – I self-admittedly collect hot sauces, but they never stay on the shelf for long!

5. Can you share an embarrassing work moment? 

During my first week as an intern I called the Food Network and asked to speak to Bobby Flay, in which I hoped to pitch a segment idea for a new product. He was listed in our database as a producer, and I was still green when it came to knowing the big names in food. I’ll never forget the look on my colleagues’ faces or the confusion in the receptionist’s voice. I’ve come a long way since.

5 Questions with SPPR Featuring Kali Mungovan

This week we’re excited to welcome our new intern Kali Mungovan to the Soda Pop PR team. With experience in government and agency PR, Kali looks forward to continuing to learn and grow in an agency setting. Read on to find out about her surprising experience post-grad and what her not so hidden talent is.

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1. As a California native, what did you miss about your home state while going to school in Oregon?

SUN! I didn’t realize how much I took the LA sunshine for granted until I left the Golden State. While I’m a big fan of changing seasons and yes, even the rain, I couldn’t help but miss that Vitamin D. When 55 and partly cloudy becomes the new 75 and sunny, you know you’ve become a true Oregonian.

 

2. After majoring in Public Relations, what did you find most surprising about your first real world experience in the industry?

I think the most surprising thing for me was grasping just how big the PR industry really is. In school I was taught the basis of traditional PR and while I did have the opportunity to work with clients through my classes, stepping out into the real world was a little overwhelming. The options seemed endless. Although all experience is good experience, I believe it is important to understand your interests and stay true to what you enjoy doing as you work to find your niche.

 

3. We love talking about food at SPPR! From start to finish, what would be your ideal food day?

For breakfast I’d have to get chocolate chip pancakes and home fries with extra ketchup from Studio One Cafe in Eugene, OR. I’d then take it south for a pitaya bowl with extra granola from Swami’s in San Diego. For dinner I’d go back to my hometown of Torrance, CA for Gaetano’s Tagliatelle and Chianti Short Ribs (with a glass of wine of course). And because no good day is complete without dessert, Salt & Straw on NW 23rd in Portland would end my ideal food day (they have locations in LA now but there’s just nothing like the original).

 

4. If you had unlimited funds and two weeks off, where would you go?

The list is endless but first on my list would have to be Ireland. I fell in love with the country after studying abroad in Galway and have been wanting to go back since the second I got on my plane back to the States. I would spend the two weeks road tripping to each end of the island and visit all of the unique cities and towns that I may have missed my first time there. I would also have to drink my weight in Bulmer’s cider because as much as I try to convince myself otherwise, it just doesn’t taste the same here in America.

 

5. You were the captain of your dance team in college, do you have any signature moves on the dance floor?

Technique wise, turns are definitely my strong suit but if I were to ever find myself in a dance battle I would have to bring out the worm. It’s one of my better talents and I am proud to admit that I can do it going backwards AND forwards.

(For more from Kali, you can find her on Instagram @kalimungovan)

5 Questions with SPPR Featuring Grandma Phelan

Whether it’s in history books or biopics, at SPPR we love hearing the stories of wise women who’ve blazed a trail before us. This week we’re excited to welcome a woman who has played a vital role in the history of our own Kelly Phelan Johnston: her grandmother. Grandma Phelan recently turned 99 so we asked her to share some of her experience with relationships, stress and remembering what’s really important.

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1. How do you think that women have changed since you were little?

Women now have more confidence in themselves.

  • When I was born in 1916, women were not allowed to vote. That came four years later, in 1920. They depended upon their husbands for everything they needed. The names of Gloria Steinem and Betty Friedan were names we hadn’t yet heard. Now females owe a lot to them both. They gave us confidence.

Women take more pride in their appearance.

  • This is a good thing, within reason. My mother wore no make-up so I persuaded her to let me put a bit of rouge on her cheeks. We were on the screened-in porch of our home. There was a glint in her eyes as she allowed me to work on this “slightly naughty” (for her) project. I had a very good time modernizing her. However, I don’t remember her ever doing this on her own.

Women now travel much more than they used to.

  • When I was young, most roads were badly paved. One summer my mother, sister, cousin and I drove to Buffalo, NY to visit relatives. I was twelve years old at the time and that was the longest trip I had ever taken, it never occurred to me that someday I might go to Europe. But time passed and yes, I did go to Europe.

2. You continue to maintain long term relationships with many different people. What are your tips for others to do the same?

“In order to have a friend, you must BE A FRIEND.” This is so true. I am no authority but here are a few ideas:

  • If a person has a birthday, send him/her a card plus a little personal note. Make it more than a regular birthday card.
  • If he/she is ill, send a card with a note added. Make it special; it is no fun being sick. Send some flowers if you can afford it. At least let them know that they are being thought of.
  • Listen to what your friends tell you about their lives. Most people are poor listeners. Do others a favor and listen while they speak. Don’t let your eyes look around the room as they talk. Don’t be anxious to top the stories they have told you.

3. What in life are the most important things to you?

  • Color – I must be surrounded with colors I enjoy. French blue with a punch of raspberry near it makes me smile. Add a bit of soft yellow and it looks even better.
  • Music – Going to a good classical concert makes me forget any sadness in my life.
  • Humor – People who have a good sense of humor are fun to be around. It is fun to laugh.
  • Reading – An inspirational book clears my mind.
  • Praying – For people who have so little.
  • Using my hands – To knit, to play the piano, to make stamp pictures and to crochet.

4. What are the things in life that you worried about but weren’t worth the worry and stress?

I still remember when I had to go to Speech Class in high school. I was so worried about having to speak in front of others that I was almost paralyzed. That now seems so strange. When I was young, I worried more than I do now but really, I was never much of a worrier. I kept very busy. That is the trick, I suppose: Keep busy doing worthwhile things. 

5. You have a philosophy of spend, save and share. Why is this such an important lesson?

Perhaps, it should be: save, share and spend. If you have to ask why these three things are good, just try them. You will see. Saving is the hardest part, so make yourself do it. Very few people save much. That has to be learned and it is difficult. Share with someone who has less than you do. Then spend and enjoy whatever you buy for yourself! You will deserve it.