We’re Hiring: Spring Intern (Paid)

The SPPR team is growing and we’re looking for a rock star intern to join the team this Spring. Candidates must be hard-working, creative and quick-learning college students/recent grads with a passion for the food & beverage industry. If that sounds like you, read on.

Responsibilities include:

  • Assisting with general daily office and administrative duties
  • Creating media lists and event/campaign recaps
  • Researching, writing, editing and distributing press materials
  • Working as part of an account team to implement media plans
  • Tracking print, online, broadcast and social media for ideas and coverage
  • Preparing client bios, fact sheets, press clips and images
  • Drafting social media content and managing a content calendar

What we are looking for…

  • Organized, self-starter, takes initiative, is resourceful and likes a challenge
  • Strong interest in public relations
  • Excellent written, verbal and interpersonal communication skills
  • PC proficient, particularly in the Microsoft Suite, including Word, Excel,  PPT and Outlook
  • Internet research and social media savvy
  • Ability to multi-task
  • Experience in handling routine office tasks
  • Excellent people skills, attention to detail and amazing follow through
  • Preferably some experience working in the culinary, wine or travel industries
  • Someone who wants to learn a lot, have fun and grow with us!

Please send résumé, cover letter, 2-3 writing samples & a brief overview of why you want to join the SPPR team to sayhi@sodapop-pr.com.

This is a full-time (35-40 hours per week) paid internship. Candidate must be based in Los Angeles.

SPPR New Year’s Goals: 2017, Let’s Do This

Everyone loves a clean slate and at SPPR we’re filling ours with a to-do list of fun projects and foodie goals for the New Year. Read on as the team breaks down our plans to eat, read and travel our way through 2017.

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(Photo c/o Oh Happy Day)

Dyan:
To Go: Sun Valley, Idaho. My husband and I have been talking about exploring a new winter destination for our annual ski/snowboarding trip for years. Aside from the picturesque setting, abundance of runs for beginners and an outdoor ice skating rink, it also has a rich history (Hemingway was a fan, he completed For Whom the Bell Tolls while staying at Sun Valley Lodge!)
To Eat: My dream would be to plan monthly trips to different cities with the sole purpose of trying the best culinary classics and hot spots in each location.  Realistically? I’d like to hit up the Roberta’s Pizza Pop-Up before closes. I’m also looking forward to my friend Steve Samson’s new restaurant Rossoblu which is scheduled to open soon!
To Read:  Tools of Titans by Tim Ferriss. I’m a fan of his podcast and this book summarizes the best tools, tactics and learnings from his most notable guests. It’s over 700 pages and meant to be digested in small, manageable doses. It’s safe to say, I’ll be reading throughout the year.
To Do: I purchased a journal over the holidays with the goal of setting aside time to jot down my non-work thoughts and creative ideas. I have dozens of notebooks but they all contain work plans, meeting notes, to-dos, etc. Creative writing was a passion of mine in college (I’d die if you found any of my old journals, so “My So-Called Life”) and I’m eager to pick it back up.

Kelly:
To Go: Sedona! Since my husband recently got his pilot’s license, we plan to do a weekend getaway to this beautiful place neither of us has been to before.
To Eat: Erven in Santa Monica
To Read: I was gifted Big Little Lies, so I hope to read it before the TV series comes out
To Do: My goal is to shop my local Sunday farmer’s market more often in 2017. Shopping local is so important and in California we have an abundance of delicious, fresh food, I need to take advantage of it!

Becky:
To Go: Back to Italy; Our new client Lucini Italia has me missing the land of pasta and olive oil.
To Eat: Belcampo; I met the founder Anya Fernald at an event last year and have vowed to treat myself to an organic, highest-quality-you-can-get steak (or at least a Belcampo Burger) at some point soon.
To Read: I bought J.K. Rowling’s The Casual Vacancy a few months ago and haven’t gotten around to reading it yet. I have so much love for J.K. that I’m feeling guilty for putting it off.
To Do: Refresh my living space. I’ve had the same couch since my husband and I were dating and the same dining room table my parents passed down to me after college. It’s time to make some big girl furniture purchases.

Colleen:
To Go: I am hoping to make it back to Paris this year and spend my days writing in coffee shops and haunting Shakespeare and Company.
To Eat: I know I lose all of my LA foodie cred for this, but I still haven’t been to Gjelina! Definitely need to remedy that in 2017.
To Read: One of my all-time favorite authors Joan Didion has a new book coming out (in 61 days, not that I’m counting) so that is at the top of my list. Also, Infinite Jest. I swear this is the year that I finally finish David Foster Wallace’s epic and exhaustingly long masterpiece.
To Do: In light of our recent election results, I’m committing to take a more active role in opposing injustice and supporting causes doing good work.

Deidre:
To Go: 2017 is all about the U.S.! I have some fun trips lined up, including: Nashville, Austin, Chicago, San Francisco and NYC to name a few. Fingers crossed for an opportunity to go abroad – I’ll even be happy with Mexico if I can make it happen.
To Eat: There are so many in LA I am eager to go to! Especially wanting to hit up the celebrity hot spots, like NOBU Malibu, SUR and AOC.
To Read: The Girl on the Train and Luckiest Girl Alive
To Do: I really hope to attend another Ellen taping! If not, attend a late night taping like Jimmy Kimmel, learn to meal prep/ spend less money on food and get outside more!

Camryn:
To Go: New York! I’d love to visit my younger brother who’s out there for school.
To Eat: I’ve really been wanting to try Maré on Melrose. You have to use a secret entrance!
To Read: A Gentleman in Moscow, a gift I received through our SPPR holiday book exchange.
To Do: Go to a cooking class!

Food for Thought with Dana Renee Ashmore

As 2016 winds down, we’re excited to share one last interview in the “Food for Thought” series. This week we welcome Dana Renee Ashmore to the blog. After years as a film and television producer, this inspiring lady used her great eye, florist chops and passion for giving back to found Gratitude Collaborative. The L.A.-based company offers curated gift boxes with a built in donation to provide meals to USA children in need. (It also happens to be the perfect holiday gift source if you’re panicking about what to get your boss/best friend/mother-in-law this year.) Read on for Dana’s insights on social media, creativity and what having a mission means for your brand.

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1. What do you look for when you’re searching for brands to include in the Gratitude Collaborative boxes?

We look at brands that we have tried and tested and love, and we love working with smaller brands and knowing the people behind the items we sell. We also trust our friends and people we work with. Every week we sit down and discuss new brands and see if we can find new ones to bring on.

2. How do you find inspiration when you’re in a rut creatively?

Step away and do something fun. Whenever I spend too much time trying to think of something to do, or feel like I’m in a rut, I just get out with friends and take my mind off of it. I think sometimes over-thinking can really make it worse. It’s really doing what feels natural instead of forced.

3. What are challenges you’ve encountered running a small business that aims to give back?

A couple things:  Our brand is that we are a gift company that gives back by providing meals to kids in the USA. In the beginning, our charitable efforts were well-intentioned but unfocused.  We provided art classes, after-school sponsorships and schools supplies to families that needed it. We still do more than provide meals, but at the time, people were really confused by what we were doing. They knew we gave back, but our brand wasn’t aligned with our mission. I think with a company that gives back, you just have to be clear on what you do, and make it easy to understand.

Second, what to do with the little money you have, and how to get yourself out there. Since your profits are not all going back to you or the company, you have smaller margins. It’s hard to make the right choices to help get your name out there. It’s hard when no one knows you and you are just getting started. It’s hard to try to sell yourself in an over-saturated and overexposed market.

4. How do you make sure your social media content is always on brand?

The best advice I have ever been given is to take 90% of my photos with a digital camera and the rest with my iPhone. That’s not for everyone, but for what we sell, we want the flowers to always be consistent in lighting and colors. In the beginning we tried a few things that didn’t work and then naturally fell into a place where we feel comfortable. I also use an app called Planoly; it helps me see my photos in a grid before they post so I can make sure they match with the other ones. This app has helped so much.

5. If you could speak to pre-business starting Dana, what advice would you give? Is there a piece of common advice given to small business owners that you would tell her to ignore?

Trust yourself and Customer Service is a must. Starting a small business is full of small decisions that can cost you lots of money.  You have to know ahead of time that not everything is going to be a win and leave financial space for that to happen.  As for Customer Service, we have someone that checks emails almost 24 hours a day to make sure we are available. Our customers are the reason any small business is running, and you have to remember that even when you’re tired, frustrated and hungry. Some customers will always think you are Amazon and have hundreds of people working around the clock. Instead, you have 3.

Keep up with Dana Renee at Gratitude Collaborative and on her beautiful Instagram.

Friendsgiving with Tillamook

November is the perfect time to give thanks, and we always look forward to sharing our gratitude with loved ones while happily embracing the excuse to reach for second servings and dessert (without judgment). One of our favorite new traditions however, is Friendsgiving, the chance to enjoy a Thanksgiving meal with your buds before or after the family festivities. A few weeks ago, we were fortunate to spend an afternoon with some of our favorite creatives, writers, bloggers and photographers, celebrating #RealFoodSunday with a Friendsgiving Brunch hosted by Tillamook.

Old friends and new were brought together at Light Lab to enjoy a beautiful Thanksgiving inspired brunch prepared by Barrett Prendergast of Valleybrink Road while learning more about Tillamook’s #RealFoodSunday movement.

Tillamook launched Real Food Sunday because of their devotion to making food the right way – with the highest quality ingredients, nothing artificial and without cutting corners to increase profits. Real Food Sunday is meant to make choosing Real Food easier for everyone, starting with one day a week. So why Sunday? Sunday is the day when big meals are cooked, families eat together and plans are made for the week ahead. Sundays are special. Tillamook believes Real Food should be a part of that, and we couldn’t agree more.

Seasonal décor styled by Anne Sage provided endless holiday inspiration and major #FOMO.

Guests enjoyed and took home some of our favorite real food goodies that were generously contributed by Alma Chocolate, Bob’s Red Mill, Entube, Health-Ade Kombucha, Hester & Cook, Jacobsen Salt Co., Le Grand Courtage, Mountain Valley Water and QUIN Candy.

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We are so thankful to have clients, partners and friends that value the importance of a shared meal and good food! Cheers to a happy and healthy Thanksgiving!

Team Soda Pop PR

5 Scary Millennial Myths

“Millennial” is the watchword these days. It’s a target demographic for brands, source of confusion for baby boomers and an overall hotbed of opinions. More than half of the SPPR team falls into this carefully studied generation and in honor of Halloween, we’d like to set the record straight by debunking a few millennial myths that are so wrong, it’s scary.

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1. Millennials are lazy: In addition to being an overused generalization made about our generation, this is also the most confusing. While copious articles suggest that we are lazy, it’s also been suggested that we are responsible for vacation shaming and most likely to be work martyrs. The fact is, 47% of millennials in management positions have begun working more hours in the last five years, compared with only 38% of Generation X and 28% of Baby Boomers. Millennials are also more likely to have a side hustle which means pursuing a passion that requires extra work for very little extra money. We’re a hardworking bunch at SPPR and we feel that lazy is a personality trait found in individual people, not entire generations.

2. Millennials are the Most Entitled Generation Ever: It’s true that millennials are a generation with expectations. Most millennials who graduated from college hoped to find a job they enjoyed because we were told by our parents that if we worked hard, this is what we could expect. Millennials may be less willing to do work we find uninspiring but we are also willing to take a pay cut to do work we love. We seek out meaningful work, and like our parents hope to one day achieve “The American Dream,” albeit our own redefined version of this dream.

3. Millennials Use of Social Media is a Liability: We won’t deny it, we’re embarrassingly connected on social media. This sometimes makes us annoying lunch dates and bad at being in the moment but it also makes us globally connected and willing to champion brands and companies we admire in a very public way (91% of millennials make Facebook places and foursquare check-ins public).  You may have seen the stories about career-ruining tweets and public company bashing but we have too. 59% of millennials know that complaining about work is a bad move and 70% of millennials think their reputation at work is more important than their social media reputation. The majority of us are social media savvy enough to present the best version of ourselves (and our jobs) online and we’ve learned to use our social media skills as a professional asset.

4. Millennials Only Want to Work Remotely: At SPPR, we have the ability to work remotely twice a month and company-wide more than 65% of these days go unused. This isn’t because there’s a stigma about taking them, it’s because we genuinely like seeing each other every day. It’s true that many millennials want to work remotely but a recent study found that 42% of millennials still prefer to work from offices. The root of this myth is a desire for flexibility. For some of us, that does mean the option to travel as much as we’d like, working from coworking spaces along the way. Others find that we are actually more engaged when working from the comfort of our own home. However for many of us, we want the option to occasionally seek the inspiration of a new environment by working from a coffee shop or have the option to work from home if say, the dog is sick and we don’t want to leave him alone all day. If you peel away the layers of this millennial myth, you’ll find we’re a generation who wants to be as inspired and productive as possible while we work and has been creative enough to think outside the cubical to make it happen!

5. Millennials Will Leave You to Start Their Own Company:  While our independence and free-spirited thinking does make the millennial generation more entrepreneurial, this myth overlooks one key factor. The days of working at one company for your entire career, even if you really want to, are gone. After watching our parents find themselves laid off unexpectedly due to the recession or “restructuring” we headed into our careers with more fluid expectations. We had back-up plans to go it alone. For some millennials, those back-up plans turn into a full time career thanks to a combination of good timing and serious hustle. We’re inspired to see so many awesome business owners in our ranks but not every millennial fancies themselves the next Evan Spiegel. 65% of millennials say an opportunity for personal development is the most influential factor in their current job and 52% said opportunities for career progression make an employer attractive. Which means that many millennials actually want to grow with you and that’s a serious priority for us.

Food for Thought with Leslie Stephens

We’re back with another “Food for Thought” this week featuring Cupcakes and Cashmere Associate Editor Leslie Stephens. The SPPR team met Leslie over a can of wine and immediately bonded with this friendly foodie. Leslie recently moved from New York where she was a Food52 editor. She now brings her adventurous spirit and an enthusiasm for food, fashion and décor to Cupcakes and Cashmere with fun and fresh coverage. Read on for a real look at what it’s like to turn a penchant for writing and a love of food into an awesome career.

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1. What’s the biggest difference between the NY and LA food scenes?

Historically in New York, the best food has always been equated with high-end restaurants opened by top chefs, like Thomas Keller’s Per Se or Daniel Humm’s Eleven Madison Park, even though there’s recently been a shift towards high-end restaurants opened by previously unknown, young chefs, like Contra and Semilla. In L.A. however, the hole-in-the-wall spots are much more celebrated, which is why you get this amazing culture of street tacos, food trucks, and tiny San Gabriel Valley Chinese restaurants on Jonathan Gold’s 101 list of best restaurants.

2. What do you look for when you’re searching for Cupcakes & Cashmere content inspiration?

When it comes to writing for a lifestyle blog, content is everywhere. A meal at an amazing taco truck can become an article on the Best Tacos in L.A. the same way a simple, unique tradition can become a whole post idea. Since the blog is so interwoven with our lives, the content is really coming from everything we find interesting and engaging in our own lives.

3. What do you do when writers block hits or you’re in a rut creatively?

I feel like there’s no writer’s block or creative rut a quick conversation can’t fix. Even saying, “Hey, what do you think of this?” to my Editorial Director is often enough to span a back-and-forth conversation that can get me back on the right track or guide me towards a new, more interesting direction. To me, that’s the value of working with a tight-knit team.

4. We heard you’re a Pete Wells fan, anyone else you admire or look up to in the food industry?

Food writers are my celebrities: Kate Krader, Sam Sifton, Andrew Knowlton, Phyllis Grant, Adam Sachs, our contributor, Gaby Dalkin, Ruth Reichl, Mimi Sheraton, Dana Goodyear, Jonathan Gold—the list literally doesn’t stop.

5. What advice would you give someone hoping to have a career in editorial? 

Start doing it in any way you can. The hardest part of becoming a writer or editor is creating a body of work you can show as an example at an interview, so if you’re able to write your own blog or even pitch a few freelance articles, every piece of work counts.

Keep up with Leslie Stephens at Cupcakes and Cashmere and on Instagram.